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Robert Covolo Fashion Theology & Public Discourse

Robert Covolo Fashion Theology & Public Discourse

Robert Covolo Fashion Theology, Public Discourse | Show Notes

Christians today have no shortage of opinions on how we should dress. Fashion is often perceived in conservative circles as something that women in particular must be very cautious about. If you’ve been around purity culture, you know what I mean: should women wear leggings? Can skirts be above the knee? Can we wear crop tops or off-the-shoulder tops? What about men?

They’re under pressure as well to dress in a manner that doesn’t endorse the feminizing of the culture. The ground motive for these questions aren’t actually new. They’re quite old – older than the Victorian Period – in fact, they go back to the patristics and key figures from church history including Tertullian, Augustine, Aquinas, up through the Reformation period with Luther and Calvin, and even into modern day with Abraham Kuyper. The rigid requirements of purity culture, are more in line with Tertullian, an ascetic who sought a uniformity to all of culture that guys like Abraham Kuyper rebuffed in favor of a pluralistic approach.

Who knew that fashion was a major talking point for so many theologians? The interview you’re about to hear is a condensed conversation with Robert Covolo, who recently published his Ph.D. dissertation on Fashion Theology from a Reformed perspective. Join me, Kerry Baldwin, with Robert Covolo, as we Dare to Think about the theology of fashion and public discourse.

To support the Mere Liberty Podcast, visit mereliberty.com/membership.

Purchase Robert Covolo’s book, Fashion Theology, through my Amazon affiliate link: https://amzn.to/3sI0kWG 

Members Only:

FULL Robert Covolo Fashion Theology Interview

Robert Covolo Fashion Theology, Public Discourse | Show Notes
Christians today have no shortage of opinions on how we should dress. Fashion is often perceived in conservative circles as something that women in particular must be very cautious about. If you’ve been around purity culture, you know what I mean: should women wear leggings? Can skirts be above the knee? Can we wear crop tops or off-the-shoulder tops? What about men?

They’re under pressure as well to dress in a manner that doesn’t endorse the feminizing of the culture. The ground motive for these questions aren . . .

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Robert Covolo | Featured Guest Bio

Robert Covolo is a cultural theologian residing in Los Angeles. He has served as a scholar at the Visual Faith Institute of Art and Architecture, on faculty at the Torrey Honors Institute, and currently directs the Center for Pastoral Residents, Christ Church Sierra Madre. When not theologizing on everyday practices, he enjoys mountain biking, surfing, canyoneering, and Mexican food.

PhD, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
PhD, Fuller Theological Seminary
BA, San Jose State University

Robert Covolo Fashion Theology, Public Discourse | Show Notes

Christians today have no shortage of opinions on how we should dress. Fashion is often perceived in conservative circles as something that women in particular must be very cautious about. If you’ve been around purity culture, you know what I mean: should women wear leggings? Can skirts be above the knee? Can we wear crop tops or off-the-shoulder tops? What about men?

They’re under pressure as well to dress in a manner that doesn’t endorse the feminizing of the culture. The ground motive for these questions aren’t actually new. They’re quite old – older than the Victorian Period – in fact, they go back to the patristics and key figures from church history including Tertullian, Augustine, Aquinas, up through the Reformation period with Luther and Calvin, and even into modern day with Abraham Kuyper. The rigid requirements of purity culture, are more in line with Tertullian, an ascetic who sought a uniformity to all of culture that guys like Abraham Kuyper rebuffed in favor of a pluralistic approach.

Who knew that fashion was a major talking point for so many theologians? The interview you’re about to hear is a condensed conversation with Robert Covolo, who recently published his Ph.D. dissertation on Fashion Theology from a Reformed perspective. Join me, Kerry Baldwin, with Robert Covolo, as we Dare to Think about the theology of fashion and public discourse.

To support the Mere Liberty Podcast, visit mereliberty.com/membership.

Purchase Robert Covolo’s book, Fashion Theology, through my Amazon affiliate link: https://amzn.to/3sI0kWG 

Members Only:

FULL Robert Covolo Fashion Theology Interview

Robert Covolo Fashion Theology, Public Discourse | Show Notes
Christians today have no shortage of opinions on how we should dress. Fashion is often perceived in conservative circles as something that women in particular must be very cautious about. If you’ve been around purity culture, you know what I mean: should women wear leggings? Can skirts be above the knee? Can we wear crop tops or off-the-shoulder tops? What about men?

They’re under pressure as well to dress in a manner that doesn’t endorse the feminizing of the culture. The ground motive for these questions aren . . .

Members Only Content

If you're a member, please login at the bottom of this page. If you're not a member, please join the community by becoming a member.

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Kerry Baldwin
B.A. Philosophy, Arizona State University. My writing focuses on libertarian philosophy and reformed theology and aimed at the educated layperson. I am a confessionally Reformed Christian orthodox Presbyterian in the tradition of J. Gresham Machen (1881 – 1937)

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